gel hand sanitizer pop top

GEL HAND SANITIZER: Great sizes and prices: 8 fl oz + 6.5 fl oz + larger sizes in pop top: 12 fl oz: ($5.80) and 16 fl oz: $6.90

gel hand sanitizer

This Gel Hand Sanitizer is one of many ways that people can help reduce the spread of COVID-19. In many cases, people do not have access to soap and water to wash their hands, so small size containers of FDA Registered Formula sanitization gel increase safety and decrease the potential of infection from touching the face.

Gel Hand Sanitizer VIDEO Highlight

gel hand sanitizer 6.5 oz

For Gel Hand Sanitizer ORDERING & LOGISTICS CONTACT: Sales@PPESourceInternational.com

Purge Virus is pleased to provide major volume users and/or Distributors/Resellers with factory-direct wholesale pricing on Gel Hand Sanitizer as well as other protective gear. This particular product is one of many that are currently in inventory across multiple warehouses in the U.S. See: https://purgevirus.com/ppe/. Other Gel Hand Sanitizer sizes and pump dispensers are also available.

Some of our Purge Virus consortium members have Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in-stock in the US at varying quantity levels with more on the way. The wholesale factory-direct pricing comes from trusted relationships with overseas manufacturers, that in some cases span multiple decades. In the rush to fulfill PPE demand during COVID-19, the key is in the due diligence of the certifications to ensure top quality and performance. We focus on quality and certification at the right price. This Gel Hand Sanitizer is an example of our commitment to help reduce the negative impacts of COVID-19.

While we do not set any specific retail price, the current Gel Hand Sanitizer products on the market at this approximate size range, that follow the FDA and WHO formula guidelines for effective bacteria removal, are listed at $.70 or more per fluid ounce. With 6.5 fl oz this Gel Hand Sanitizer squeeze bottle has an MSRP of $4.50 to come in at or below the market prices and provide Distributors/Resellers with a 25% margin.

We will continue to re-stock our partner warehouses, but we cannot guarantee quantities of Gel Hand Sanitizers and/or prices beyond the currently available inventory.

gel hand sanitizer

Antiseptic Gel Hand Sanitizer

Both of these sizes of Antiseptic Gel Hand Sanitizer, as well as the larger containers are manufactured according to the Temporary Policy for Preparation of Certain Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency (CoViD-19); Guidance for Industry.

The Antiseptic Gel Hand Sanitizer is manufactured following United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) grade ingredients in the preparation of the product (percentage in final product formulation) consistent with World Health Organization (WHO) recommendations:

  1. Alcohol (ethanol) 70%, volume/volume (v/v)
  2. Glycerol
  3. Carbomer
  4. Aminomethyl Propanol
  5. Water

Purpose: Antiseptic Gel Hand Sanitizer

Use: Antiseptic Gel Hand Sanitizer to help reduce bacteria that potentially can cause disease. For use when soap and water are not available

Q&A for Consumers: Hand Sanitizers and COVID-19 relative to this Gel Hand Sanitizer

Source: https://www.fda.gov/drugs/information-drug-class/qa-consumers-hand-sanitizers-and-covid-19

The FDA is working with U.S. government partners including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), medical product manufacturers, and international partners to address the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Find the most recent FDA updates on our Coronavirus Disease 2019 page.

Question #1 relative to Disinfectants and Sanitizers:

Q. Where can I buy hand sanitizer? If I can’t find it in the store, can I make my own?
A. Many retail stores and pharmacies sell hand sanitizers. However, we understand that many stores have run out of hand sanitizers and they may be difficult to find. To help increase the availability of hand sanitizers, FDA has issued guidance for the temporary preparation of alcohol-based hand sanitizers by some companies and pharmacies during the public health emergency posed by COVID-19. See Temporary Policy for Preparation of Certain Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency (COVID-19) Guidance for Industry1, the Policy for Temporary Compounding of Certain Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency2, and Temporary Policy for Manufacture of Alcohol for Incorporation Into Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency (COVID-19)3.

FDA recommends that consumers do not make their own hand sanitizer. If made incorrectly, hand sanitizer can be ineffective, and there have been reports of skin burns from homemade hand sanitizer. The agency lacks verifiable information on the methods being used to prepare hand sanitizer at home and whether they are safe for use on human skin.

Question #2 relative to Hand Sanitizer supply:

Q. Is the FDA taking measures to increase the supply of hand sanitizers?
A. Yes. FDA has recently developed multiple guidance documents for the temporary preparation of hand sanitizers by pharmacies and other companies during the public health emergency posed by COVID-19. The guidance documents describe circumstances under which the agency does not intend to take action when these companies prepare alcohol-based hand sanitizers for consumer use and for use as health care personnel hand rubs for the duration of the public health emergency. FDA has also issued guidance for the temporary manufacture of alcohol by alcohol producers to use as the active ingredient in hand sanitizer products1,2,3.

Question #3 relative to Gel Sanitizer on skin:

Q. What do I do if I get a rash or other reaction to hand sanitizer?
A. Call your doctor if you experience a serious reaction to hand sanitizer. FDA encourages consumers and health care professionals to report adverse events experienced with the use of hand sanitizers to FDA’s MedWatch Adverse Event Reporting program:

  • Complete and submit the report online; or
  • Download and complete the form, then submit it via fax at 1-800-FDA-0178.
  • Include as much information as you can about the product that caused the reaction, including the product name, the manufacturer, and the lot number (if available).

Question #4 relative to Sanitization to combat disease:

Q. Many surface cleaners and disinfectants say they can be used against SARS-CoV-2. What does this mean? Can I use these products on my hands or body to prevent or treat the virus?
A. Always follow the instructions on household cleaners. Do not use disinfectant sprays or wipes on your skin because they may cause skin and eye irritation. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are not intended for use on humans or animals. Disinfectant sprays or wipes are intended for use on hard, non-porous surfaces.

View the current list of products that meet EPA’s criteria for use against SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19. See Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Frequently Asked Questions for more information.

Question #5 relative to Gel Hand Sanitizer:

Q. If I add alcohol to non-alcohol hand sanitizer, will this be better to prevent COVID-19?
A. No. Addition of alcohol to an existing non-alcohol hand sanitizer is unlikely to result in an effective product. FDA has also issued guidance for the temporary preparation of certain alcohol-based hand sanitizer products by firms during the COVID-19 public health emergency. These temporary policies do not extend to non-alcohol based products at this time.

Question #6 relative to Gel Hand Sanitizer:

Q. Does the FDA regulate all hand sanitizers? Do hand sanitizers come with product information on their labeling?
A. Hand sanitizers are over-the-counter (OTC) drugs regulated by FDA.

Hand sanitizers that meet FDA’s OTC drug review conditions or that are manufactured under the conditions in FDA’s temporary policy will include a “Drug Facts” label similar to the ones found at the end of the guidance: Temporary Policy for Preparation of Certain Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Products During the Public Health Emergency (COVID-19). Consumers should assure they are following the warnings and precautions described on this label, particularly regarding use in children. The Drug Facts label will also describe the ingredients in the product.

To address the supply shortage of hand sanitizers, FDA has recently developed multiple guidance documents for the temporary preparation of hand sanitizers by pharmacies and other companies during the public health emergency posed by COVID-19. The guidance documents describe circumstances under which the agency does not intend to take action when these companies prepare alcohol-based hand sanitizers for consumer use and for use as health care personnel hand rubs for the duration of the public health emergency.

Question #7 relative to expiration of sanitizing fluids:

Q. Do hand sanitizers have an expiration date? Are they still effective after the expiration date?
A. OTC drug products generally must list an expiration date unless they have data showing that they are stable for more than 3 years. FDA does not have information on the stability or effectiveness of drug products past their expiration date (See 21 CFR 211.137). Hand sanitizer produced under the temporary policies for hand sanitizer production and compounding may not have an expiration date listed because they are expected to be used during this public health emergency1 ,2,3.

Question #8 relative to storing Disinfectant liquids or gels:

Q. Where should hand sanitizer be stored?
A. Hand sanitizer should be stored out of reach, and sight, of children. It should not be stored above 105°F (for example, it should not be stored in a car during the summer months).

Question #9 relative to decontaminating childrens’ hands:

Q. Is hand sanitizer dangerous for children?
A. For children under six years of age, hand sanitizer should be used with adult supervision. When used according to the directions on the Drug Facts Label, hand sanitizer is not dangerous for children.

Hand sanitizer is dangerous when ingested by children. Drinking only a small amount of hand sanitizer can cause alcohol poisoning in children. However, there is no need to be concerned if your children eat with or lick their hands after using hand sanitizer. It is also important to keep the product out of the eyes.

Every month, there are hundreds of calls to Poison Control for unintentional ingestion of hand sanitizer. In March 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic), calls to Poison Control related to hand sanitizer increased by 79% compared to March of 2019. The majority of these calls were for unintentional exposures in children 5 years of age and younger. Therefore, it is very important to store hand sanitizer out of reach and monitor children when they are using hand sanitizer.

Question #10 relative to Sanitizing for children:

Q. What should you do if your child ingests hand sanitizer?
A. If your child ingests hand sanitizer, call poison control or a medical professional immediately.

Question #11 relative to Gel based Hand Sanitizer:

Q. What are denaturants and why are they added to hand sanitizer?
A. Denaturants are added to alcohol to make it less appealing to ingest. Denatured alcohol is used in hand sanitizer to deter children from unintentional ingestion – the denatured alcohol makes the hand sanitizer taste bad so children will not want to continue once they have had a taste. There are a number of adverse events every year resulting from intentional or unintentional ingestion of hand sanitizer, which is a particular concern for young children.

Question #12 relative to Gel type Hand Sanitizer:

Q. How can I find hand sanitizers listed with the FDA, or verify that a company has listed its product with the FDA?
A. FDA publishes product listing information provided by the companies that make the drug on the National Drug Code (NDC) Directory. This listing does not mean the drug is approved by FDA. Anyone can look up a drug product and download the information by searching on its NDC, company name or drug name. For a list of all hand sanitizers, choose the proprietary name search, and search for the term “hand sanitizer.”

Guidances referenced in QAs:

The more that we all use Gel Hand Sanitizer when we do not have easy access the soap and water, the faster we may reduce the impact of COVID-19. Gel Hand Sanitizer is one of the tools that we can use to our advantage.